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PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 









L*j 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Metropolitan New York Library Council - METRO 



http://archive.org/details/psyearbookofcoll1969colu 




THE OATH OF HIPPOCRATES 



I swear by Apollo the physician, and Aesculapius, and Hygeia, 
and Panacea, and all the gods and goddesses, that according to 
my ability and judgement I will keep this oath and this stipula- 
tion: to reckon him who taught me this Art equally dear to me as 
my parents, to share my substance with him and relieve his 
necessities if required; to look upon his offspring as my own 
brothers and to teach them this Art, if they shall wish to learn 
it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture, and 
every other mode of instruction I will impart a knowledge of the 
Art to my own sons and those of my teachers, and to disciples 
bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, 
but to none others. I will follow the system of regimen which ac- 
cording to my ability and judgment I consider for the benefit 
of my patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and 
mischievous, I will give no deadly medicine to anyone if asked, 
nor suggest any such counsel; and in like manner I will not give 
to a woman a pessary to produce abortion. With purity and with 
holiness I will pass my life and practice my Art. I will not cut 
persons laboring under the stone, but will leave this to be done by 
men who are practitioners of this work. Into whatever houses I 
enter I will go into them for the benefit of the sick and will ab- 
stain from every voluntary act of mischief and corruption; and 
further, from the seduction of females and males, of freemen and 
slaves. Whatever, in connection with my professional practice or 
not in connection with it, I see or hear in the life of men which 
ought not to be spoken of abroad, I will not divulge, as reckoning 
that all such should be kept secret. While I continue to keep this 
oath unviolated may it be granted to me to enjoy life and the 
practice of the Art, respected by all men and all times. But 
should I trespass and violate this oath may the reverse be my lot. 



& SU<RGEO c nS 

1969 



Columbia university 

college of 

physicians & surgeons 



630 west 168th street, new york, new york, 10032 




ded 



We, the class of 1969, dedicate our yearbook 
to Dr. Yale Kneeland, Jr., who introduced us to 
the clinical evaluation of patients in his course 
in Physical Diagnosis. 

Dr. Kneeland first came to P & S in 1922 as a 
medical student, and after his graduation in 
1926, he completed his training at Presbyterian 
Hospital. He left only for active duty in World 
War II from 1942 through 1945. After the war 
his work in infectious diseases was supple- 
mented by his growing interest in the education 
of medical students. He was made Professor of 
Medicine in 1958. 



Academic life is generally thought to be characterized 
by quiet calm and the avoidance of any surprising 
changes of mood or tempo. I thought I had reached that 
quiet period "before the sunset fades", and that my era 
of surprises was over. Then came your letter and to say 
the least, I was positively speechless. This was 
particularly noticeable to my family who have never 
considered that to be bereft of speech was characteristic 
of me. Obviously it would be churlish as well as 
disingenuous not to admit how flattered I am. 
Personally, I thought that Physical Diagnosis was a 
fairly important subject and that any student who 
emerged from medical school without having tried to 
train his senses was incompletely indoctrinated in 
medicine. This would probably be considered old-fashioned 
now, but I still suspect there's truth in it. 

My heartiest good wishes as well as my thanks. God 
bless you. 



UeutU <M^€U^JH> 




cation 



DR. YALE KNEELAND, JR. 

A.B., Yale, 1922 

M.D., Columbia, 1926 



Dr. Kneeland taught the second year course in 
Physical Diagnosis with thoroughness and wit. 
His genial presence dispelled the formal 
atmosphere of the amphitheater and engaged us 
actively in his enjoyment of the art of Physical 
Diagnosis. His anecdotes not only entertained 
us, but helped to fix his proffered pearls of 
wisdom firmly in our minds. His enthusiasm for 
his subject made us eager to begin the detective 
work of physical examination. 



Medical practice and the medical school are 
changing. Laboratory tests frequently overshadow 
clinical acumen. Columbia has left Bellevue 
Hospital. The Physical Diagnosis elective and the 
perfect-score-multiple-choice final exam have 
been discontinued. Dr. Kneeland has retired. We 
are grateful that these changes were not 
completed before our time, and that we had the 
privilege of being instructed by Dr. Kneeland. He 
will long be remembered by his students for his 
warmth, his humor, and his outstanding 
contribution to medical education. 




administration 




H. HOUSTON MERRITT 

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 

Henry and Lucy Moses Professor of Neurology 

Chairman, Department of Neurology 

B.A., Vanderbilt, 1922 

M.D., Johns Hopkins, 1926 

M.A. (hon.), Harvard, 1942 



GEORGE A. PERERA 

Associate Dean 

Professor of Medicine 

B.A., Princeton, 1933 

M.D., Columbia, 1937 

Med. Sc.D., 1942 




To the graduating class, all our best wishes and congratulations! 

Although some regard this period of change as one of permissiveness, protest, 
pills, and pollution, we who know you are thoroughly optimistic. We know that 
you will continue to seek and to learn. 

Your graduation is not, we hope, a severing of ties. Rather, it is our 
opportunity to tell you how much we have enjoyed sharing four years with you 
and that our interest in you will continue. We trust, in return, that you will 
become the spokesmen and leaders to guide us and that your interest and loyalty 
to P&S will go on throughout the years. 

Addressing you on behalf of the entire faculty and as fellow physicians and 
friends, I wish each of you great happiness and success. 





ROBERT H. E. ELLIOTT, JR. 

Associate Dean 

Professor of Clinical Surgery 

B.A., Princeton, 1928 

M.D., Columbia, 1932 

Med. Sci.D., 1938 



SHIRLEY C. FISK 

Associate Dean 

Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.A., Yale, 1936 

M.D., Columbia, 1940 





/r\ 




MELVIN D. YAHR 

Associate Dean 

Professor of Neurology 

B.A., New York University, 1939 

M.D., 1943 



DOUGLAS S. DAMROSCH 

Assistant Dean 

Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

B.A., Columbia, 1937 

M.D., 1940 








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A Bum Steroid 

or 

Send a Salami to an Ex-Medical Student in the Army 

Sheep are gregarious, bacteria are clonal; 

The endocrine system is steroid hormonal, 

And it's not such a problem to catch them and tame 

them: 
It's more of a problem to draw them and name them. 
It seems that one day a squalene went berserk, 
Put his tail in his own mouth and started to work, 
And he wound up condensed into four lovely rings 
With all sorts of places for side groups and things. 
And to all the scientists' great consternation 
There were two or three names for each variation. 
But it serves them right: not content with cholesterol, 
They rolled up their sleeves and invented stilbesterol! 
Then came estradiol and lots of ergosterol; 
The sequence was getting completely preposterol. 
Both those in the fast lane and those in the slow lane 
Are just going ape over etiocholane; 
And if you think that is too much for one man alone 
Just write down the formula for etiocholanolone. 
Or maybe this will burst your complacent bubble: 
When a girl has got pregnane, then is she in trouble? 
And the corticosteroids drive me up a wall, 
Like 11-dehydrocorticosterol. 
But the finest-named steroid I've ever known 
Is pregn-5-ene-3-beta-ol-20-one. 

And it's bad enough learning the way these are treated, 
But then we go on and learn how they're excreted, 
And we work all the day and we go without rest 
To measure them all by the Zimmermann test. 
Comes the end of the term and we cram and we cram, 
And then they throw at us the final exam. 
On your knowledge of structures you may very well 

pride your; 
Now try to explain what steroids do inside you. 
One double bond makes you a boy or a girl, 
Another may make you a mouse or a squirl. 
The test might as well have been written in Braille, 
For I fear the whole class is way out in one tail. 
We'll go to Dr. Nachmansohn to recover our nerve, 
Then we'll get Dr. Fertig to work out the curve, 
And assuming they can't flunk an entire class, 
By the grace of some First Cause we'll probably pass. 
Let's hope we all put down the proper amount— 
From Abernathy-Kiess and from Lambert- Yount, 
And wish the biochemists a Christmas serene, 
Full of DNA HISStone and HISStamine. 

Don Feinfeld 




Seymour Lieberman 

"What is this class — a bunch of snakes 
or something?" 




i~~ 



Allen M. Gold 

'You'll eat those lipids!' 




10 



Parithychery Srinivasan 

"I'll show them what an untouchable can 
do!!" 



BIOCHECDISXSTO 




David Nachmansohn 

"7 am zick of zin." 





David Rittenberg 

"What this country needs is a good five-cent cigar - and 
Israel can give it to them. " 




11 



Alvin I. Krasna 

"If Mama could only see me now!" 



WKSIO C06V 







"I repeat — no more injections by medical students'. 



Richard C. Mason 

"The first time it happens you rub 
his nose in it. " 




-TiW^ 



vU> 




xW. 



John V. Taggart 



John S. Britten 

"In a sense, I'm somewhere between the oral and 
the anal phase. " 



"Who cares about countercurrent exchange — what I want to 
know is can anyone straighten out my eyebrows?" 




.JL, 




Mero Nocenti 

"An endocrine gland is like an Italian male: easily stimulated 
and difficult to suppress. " 



Louis T. Cizek 

"They've all left — now we're 
finally alone. " 




< 




I _ 



William L. Nastuk 
P&S's contribution to the Gentleman's Quarterly. 



Arnold M. Katz 
"Now — if we can only make it grow hair . 



FLUID BALANCE AND URINE SECRETION IN MAN 

On this day, limit your intake to one egg, a slice of toast, 
a small glass of fruit juice and one cup of coffee taken 
before 8 o'clock. Just before the 9 o'clock lecture, empty 
your bladder, noting the time accurately. At the beginning 
of the laboratory period again empty the bladder, noting the 
time. Save the urine collected. Thereafter collect urine 
samples at half hour intervals for a total of seven 
specimens. Immediately after collecting the second urine 
sample, drink the fluid which has been assigned to you. 
Consumption of this fluid should be completed within fifteen 
minutes. 

The class will be divided into four groups, each of which 
will receive one of the following: 

a) 1200 ml tap water 

b) 1200 ml tap water plus a subcutaneous injection of one 
to two units of pitressin 

c) 1200 ml 0.9% NaCI 

d) 1200 ml 2.0% urea 

Following this experiment the class will meet to discuss 
results. 




Raimond Emmers 

"Why do you laugh when I say that 
one wally plus one wallv equals two 
wallies?" 




13 



Martin Blank 
"Sometimes vou just draw a blank. 



hvpfcocoy 




Edward W. Dempsey 

"So this is the Department of Anatomy? You must be 
kidding!" 





Melvin Moss 

"Let me show you how we do it at P.&S. j 




Malcolm B. Carpenter 

"You don't have to be Jewish to love 
Levy's." 





Albert 

"I know I hid that bottle in here 

someplace. " 



Charles A. Ely 

"I can't understand why they don't want me to 
help them with their dissections ..." 




Charles R. Noback 

"I'm sorn' Mai — I didn't realize that I'd 
be cutting into vour royalties." 




Frederic J. Agate 

"I've been smoking since I was 
15, and now that I'm 40 . . ." 



Wilfred M. Copenhaver 

"Want to play hearts?" 



in sections through the lower 
medulla, the area dorsal to the caudal 
half of the inferior olivary nucleus 
and medial to the lateral reticular 
nucleus is the location of the nucleus 
reticularis ventralis. at higher levels 
the reticular area located medial and 
dorsal to the rostral half of the 
inferior olivary nucleus is occupied by 
the nucleus reticularis 
gigantocellularis. the latter nucleus is 
the rostral continuation of the 
nucleus reticularis ventralis. 

truex and carpenter, human 
neuroanatomy, Williams and wilkins, 
1964, p. 268. 



15 




George D. Pappas 



Richard P. Bunge 

"Only my hair dresser knows for sure 




"Do you want to play with my 
election microscope?" II 



Herbert 0. Elftman 

"I keep my left ear cocked to pick up all 
the latest information about the elbow 
joint. " 




Nancy Trotter 

'Wanna feel my liver?' 




<p A^RAsrco coev 




Harold W. Brown 

Dedicated to the seats of the mighty . 





Roger W. Williams 

"Yet let me flap this bug with gilded wings — This 
painted child of dirt that stinks and stings. " 
(Alexander Pope) 



Kathleen L. Hussey 

"That play is the tragedy, 'Man \ and its hero the 
Conquerer Worm. " 



17 



CDICftO 

mocoev 





Harry M. Rose 

"Sam! You forgot to tell them about . . .' 



Calderon Howe 

"/ wonder if this slide is vague enough for my next 
lecture?" 




Herbert Rosenkranz 

"Guildenstern may be dead, but Rosenkranz is alive and 
well at P&S. 



Bernard F. Erlanger 
"Don 't bug me. " 




L 

Paul D. Ellner 
"Hey, listen — is that hair piece ready yet?" 

Councilman Morgan 

"Take a look at the pair of knobs on this inclusion 
body! " 





^ j*-A» 



Stuart W. Tanenbaum 



"Then there's xylose, rhamnose, abequose and Godnose 




Sam M. Beiser 

"There's something erotic about conjugation. 




19 




TWRCDA 



Herbert J. Bartelstone 

"This course requires 
sophistication. " 




Wilbur H. Sawyer 

"And with kidneys at 48t a pound, that makes 



DIRECT AND INDIRECT EFFECTS OF A 



Ouinidine & Procaine Amide 


Low "Therapeu 




Indirect E 


Automaticity 
S-A Node 

Atrial Specialized Fibers (SAF) 
A-V Node 
His-Purkinje System 


I 
I 

X 
13 


u 


Effective Refractory Period 
Atrium 
A-V Node 

His-Purkinje System 
Ventricle 


I 

D 
X 
X 


U;sl 


Electrical Excitability 
Atr'um 

His-Purkinje System 
Ventricle 


I,U,D 
X 
X 




Conductivity 

S-A Node 
Atrium 
A-V Node 

His-Purkinje System 
Ventricle 


I 
I,U,D 
I 
X 
X 


U or 
Uor 

U or 





Brian F. Hoffman 

'You say man on street know more than me?!??" 



Norman Kahn 



"I only charge half as much as 
a fillins 



Bartelstone for a filling. ' 



zocoev 



Concentration 


High "Toxic" Concentration 


Total 


Total 2 




I 
lor D 

X 
lor D 


D 4 

I 

X 

D to 0, or I 




1 
D 
I 
U;shght I 


I 

I 
I 
IS 




I,U,D 

U 

u 


D 
D 
D 


D 
3 

3 


U or D 

si. D 

I 

lor U 6 

U or si. D 


D 
D 
D 
D 
D 




Frederick G 


. Hofmann 




"Just a little to 
the lecture. " 


get 


me through 








'^f^HI 












^r > 




I 








pw ^H 













Shin-Chun Wang 

"A tropine can be given by mouse. 




Lowell M. Greenbaum 

Histamine, son of histidine . 







A 

ft 
O 

O 

6 

9 



! 



-r 



L. 




Donald W. King 



"ybw should have seen his face when I got the 
job. " 




Focus, Angelo! 



22 





David Spiro 

The flower child 




THE FLOWER 




William A. Blanc 

"Zees ees ze last Babies Hospital admission 




H. Joachim Wigger 

"You must have been a beautiful baby, 'cause baby, 
look at you now. " 




Joseph Wiener 

"You, as second year medical students are in no 
position to take a stand on anything." J.W.: 
October, 1966 




Austin D. Johnston 

"Well, that's the breaks.' 



23 




John E. Ultmann 

"Bradley told me when I got to 
Chicago to look up his friend 
Dick Daley." 




Raffaele Lattes 

"I think Bob Lattes would make a great pathology 
intern. " 




Karl H. Perzin 

"If hair styling did this for me, think what it could do for 
your teratoma. " 




clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
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clinical years 
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clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical yea. s 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
clinical years 
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clinical years 
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clinical years 




"Fifteen minutes and you still haven't mentioned the 
chief complaint. " 




Kermit L. Pines 

"You see? It's not the pipe — my jaws are wired.' 



Donald F. Tapley 

'Who is the Atchley of the Atchley history form?" 




THIS IS THE 47TH CPMC ADMISSION. 




X 



c>^ 




Hamilton Southworth 

Honorary member ofS.D.S. 




Charles L. Christian 

"My son has just enrolled at L.E. 
Prep. " 





Charles A. Ragan 
"Thanks a lot. " 




Daniel V. Kimberg 

"People have a lot more guts in Boston. 




'BINGO!!" 



Edgar Leifer 

"Dr. Goldman, you missed your 
opportunity. " 



E 

I 
C 
I 




George Perera 

"It helps improve my rapport with the students . 




Harry W. Fritts, Jr. 

"I believe in thinking clearly and talking slowly, or is 
it thinking slowly and talking clearly?" 




Arthur Wertheim 

No man is an island . 





Henry Aranow 
'Your mother should be proud . 




28 



Alfred Gellhorn 

And then there were none . 




William P. Lovejoy 

"So his SGOT is elevated! What do you 
wanna make of it?" 




John L. Buchanan 

"1 didn't want to bother reading vour histories 
this time, so I'll just flunk you all." 




Harold C. Neu 

"Nu, Harold?" 




John N. Loeb 

"The picture won't be blurred if you take it at 1/1000 
of a second. " 




Sidney C. Werner 

"In the beginning, God created the thyroid. ' 



29 




Robert A. Kritzler 

"No wonder hardly any of you know me — I've 
been locked in this room for five years!" 



Dickinson W. Richards 

"So then the King of Sweden said to me . 




John H. Laragh 

"My B UN may be up but my stream is still good. ' 




30 



Albert R. Lamb 

"What do I know from G6PD? Grippe Tabs are 
what you need. " 




Richard J. Stock 



"/'// bet they use the stock caption in 
the yearbook again this year. ' 




Stuart Cosgriff 

"Pneumonia?! Start the heparin STAT!" 





Albert W. Grokoest 

"Let 's drink to Stan . . 




Paul J. Cannon 

"Today we're going to 
discuss soporifics. " 



Charles A. Rood 

31 "Oops . . . I forgot to wash my hands.' 




"You don't really have to go, you know. You could 
always repeat your clerkship." 






Donald A. Holub and Lionel Grossbard 

'You better give that patient a small tube of toothpaste. 



Hymie L Nossel 

Hemoglobin-Hymie 




OH, we've RECEIVED YOUR AP( 



Looking ahead to the twentieth century. 



" . ' . r — m l i j i i i i— p— mjfri 





George W. Melcher 

"This month we're running 2% on completed 
appraisal notes. " 




)N . . . .but. . . 



Mi£ 



9HB ' 



XCHLEY 

JON 



-• 
?■ 




James K. Cunningham 

"Some people are born with marrow, some achieve 
marrow, and some have marrow thrust upon them. " 




1 




M. Irene Ferrer 

"Just call me M.I. 



* V ■ . ■ ■■ ii ) ■[ I . l^l ^ 




Robert T. 
Whitlock 

"Time is 
whittling away 
mv locks." 



group 
clinic 




"You'll never guess what we have for you 
today." 



-6 b 




"The first three volumes haven't come up yet 
better just get started without them." 



mi- m 

"Slight hypo, slight aniso, slight poikilo 



"I'm sorry; Dr. Weyman's running a 
little late on his follow-ups today." 



-10 

I 





UH...HAVE YOU EVER HAD A PERITONSILLAR ABSCESS? 



DANA W. ATCHLEY 

"You mean to say, Dr. Weyman, that you didn't 
ask whether her headaches are more frequent 
on Tuesdays than on Wednesdays?" 




SICRGETO 



\ 



I ■ 




/ 




Thomas V. Santulli 

"Do you mean your little bugger has a hernia?' 



Robert H. E. Elliott, Jr. 

'You're kidding . . . heart transplants?" 



\ 





George H. Humphreys II 

"You see, I fooled you. It only looked as 
though I were asleep." 




Nathan Lane 

"Once upon a time, there was a little polyp . 
36 



Grant Sanger 

"When I finish, every third 
year student can locate the 
apex of the axilla!" 



r 





O 



Ferdinand F. McAllister 

"Awww, you say it only hurts when you 
walk?" 



V 



^ 



Robert H. Wylie 

"I think John Wylie would make a 
fine surgical intern. " 



*\ 



«!, 





■ 




Cushman 0. Haagensen 
Tit for tat. 





"Isn't there anything we could do to make them 
come to the rest of the classes?" 



Philip D. Wiedel 

"The other day while I was out walking I was hit 
by a speedboat." 








Alfred M. Markowitz 

'You? An intern here???' 




38 





Frederick R. Randall 

"Only when you make it as an attending can you wear a 
moustache and hippy glasses. " 




David V. Habif 

"Let not her wound 
dehiss. " 





Arthur B. Voorhees 
"Just convicted for graft. 




Sven Kister 

"Think Mammary. 



John Schullinger 

"Gee! In the yearbook? Honest??! ' 



39 




Alfred Jaretzki III 

". . . when you reach the hilum, call 
me at the Copa." 



JSK$> 0fr { 




Shivaji B. Bhonslay, Jr. 

"Funny, you don't look 
Guru-ish. " 




James R. Malm 

Iatrogenic dextrocardia. 




Bashir Zikria 

„. The monday morning blahs. 







George F. Crikelair 

"I'll do vour nose Frank, but who will do mine?" 

Bard Cosman 

"Let's see — two noses at $4500 apiece is . 




I 



Frank Gump 






9 " 



\ 



♦ 




Frederick P. Herter 

"What this place needs 
is a Young Republicans 

Club. " 



Robert G. Bertsch 

"Next time, Birkhoff, you'll do your own rectal. " 



L 




John Prudden 



"... and now ladies, after you 've stripped 
the meat from the bone ..." 




John B. Price, Jr. 

'You're from the anti-vivisection league?' 




Milton R. Porter 

"Igor, keep him on the 
table ..." 




Harold G. Barker 

"... and on opening him up I 
found cross-hatched mucosa. " 



42 






*m 





John A. Buda 

"All right, we're going to start. I want absolute 
quiet in the O.R." J.B., 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968 





Robert B. Hiatt 

"What these damned medical 
conferences need are a few girls 
who will lift their skirts. " 



~ 



n 



Charles W. Findlay 

Forever 



John M. Kinney 

The Last of the Mohicans 



r 




43 



E O c KG%0<£ 



-■ :> > 



m 



ii w. 



Robert E. Carroll 

"The Visiting Professor of Anatomy 
will now explain ..." 




S. Ashby Grantham 

"The hip bone is connected to the third bone. 



Charles T. Ryder 

"Now Charlotte — 'This little piggv . 





Frank E. Stinchfield 



"You say you're from the Internal 
Revenue Service?" 




Marvin L. Shelton 

'Now let's make no bones about it . . .' 



MEDICS 




Charles S. Neer II 

"Oh yes — how many cars did you say?" 

Joseph E. Salvatore 

"Keep his fingers loose so he can get 
his wallet out." 




^ 




David L. Andrews 

"Frank wired this one for free!' 





Harold M. Dick 

"/ should have been a 
urologist. " 



Andrew L. Bassett 

"Next year I'll play with the 
Knicks. " 



0<BSGE£<RICS & 




Charles M. Steer 

"Next year we'll abolish the 
course. " 



POST PARTUM CL 





Edward T. Bowe 

"This machine should speed up 
my pelvics infinitely. " 



IT'S EITHER ONE OF REICHERTS EPISIOTOMY 
REPAIRS OR A NEW METHOD OF BIRTH CONTROL 




evTizcocoev 




x 



Landrum B. Shettles 

In . . . this . . . business . . . you . . . gotta 
. . work . . . fast. " 





J. George Moore 

"On a clear day I can see California ' 




"Won't somebody please silence Dr. Tillman.' 






I 



<< 



J 



Equinn W. Munnell 

"How do you spell 'arrhenoblastoma'?' 



Karlis Adamsons, Jr. 

"Pregnancy? What is that?" 



a^gf^H 



3P(k 



— m - 




Solan Chao 

"It's chao time!' 




J 



^5d 



48 




Orlando J. Miller 

"Genghis Khan was NOT the last of 
the Mongols. " 




Wolfgang Tretter 

"This is the wrist action I use 
for my $50 pelvics. " 




49 



Raymond L. Vande Wiele 

"Be sure to get there on day 14. 



w^ -*•■ 



f ~ . 




W. Duane Todd 

There was a professor named Todd 
Whose manner was pleasantly odd 
He said, If you please, 
Spell my name with two D's, 
Though one was sufficient for God. 





Susan Williamson 

Miss Cuomo, I said in the fundus, not in the 
Fallopian tube. 




Robert Hall 

You don't understand Dr. Hall, we want this one. 



Raymond 
McCaffrey 

The ability to bear 
children is 
sex-linked. 



50 







Vincent Freda 

Now I have to look for another research project. 



Gilbert Vosburgh 

We used to stick our hands in up to 
the elbows. 



' 




Stanley Bysshe 

Enough of this stuff — show me 
her pelvis! 



51 





• ■> 



Edward C. Curnen, Jr. 

Cookie break 



I 
A 

ft 
I 

c 

s 



The Cystics: 



No, we don't have a cure for the common cold, but If you have green, watery 
stools ... 



dD 





Robert W. Winters 

'd rather fight than switch. 




* 




Ruth C. Harris 

Prothrombin time 34? She needs a 
liver biopsy. 



James A. Wolff 

And after I transfuse you, I'll teach 
you how to ski! 





Ralph B. Dell 

If it worked for Sampson, maybe it will work for me. 



Dean N. Martin 

I'm not checking up on you guys, but I noticed 
nobody signed up for nights on. 




Sidney Blumenthal 

Look what I got from Lilly! 

Carolyn R. Denning 

Flower Power 




> 





Katherine Sprunt 

Hell's Bells. 



Jerry C. Jacobs 

For your kid, Doctor, fifty bucks. 



Sylvia P. Griffiths 

Playmate of next month. 



55 




<nEU<R0£06 < W ATI© 




S *> 




Robert E. Lovelace 



Does the patient . . . um 
sensation in his legs? 



ah 



appreciate 



Daniel Sciarra 

This one will make a good CPC next year. 
Sidney Carter 
Carter's Little Brain Pills for little brains. 





Carmine T. Vicale 

He's lying! He can't 
feel that! 



56 



c riEU<R0SU<R6E<R'i> 



Arnold P. Gold 

And for breakfast we 
have cafe-au-lait. 









Edgar M. Housepian 

Hello? 6 West? This is Sister Mary Denise 
and we'd just like to . . . 

Melvin D. Yahr 

Look what I got from Lilly! 

J. Lawrence Pool 

He was my first brain transplant; look how well he's doing! 



Roger C. Duvoisin 

I can size up 
any man by his 
handshake. 





Emanuel M. Papper 
"C'mon down!" 



s 

C 
I 
A 
C 

I 

S 







: 





Mieczyslaw Finster 
"Women! . . . they keep me up all night!" 

Paul J. Poppers 

"A-NES-THEE-ZEE-AH" 



m 



j-t- 




tfsta 





Charles E. Wolf 

"Bob — suppose Ed were choking on a 
chicken bone — what would you do?" 




Carl T. Nelson 

"Wrong, stupid.' 




Meyer Melicow 
'I have long fingers!' 



Hans H. Zinsser 

'Raw clams will raise it. 




John K. Lattimer 

'So you only filled the first two chambers?' 





/ 



v M 



Aurelio Uson 
'This paper's a real pisser. 



59 




A. Gerard DeVoe 

Let me see! 



Dr. Baker 



We Bakers know that ENT is all 
cookbook. 





Robert M. Day 

We treat diplopia with eye patches. 




Charles A. Perera 

George told me to get a naircut and a more 
conservative tie. 

Jules Waltner 

To tell the truth, I can't see the vocal cords either. 




I 



7f\ 

i 



\ 



Olaf Haroldson, Jr. 

3 out of 4 doctors recommend 
Chlortrimeton 



Milos Basek 

3 out of 4 Doctors recommend 
Chlortrimeton. 



Lawrence Savetzky 

3 out of 4 doctors recommend 
Chlortrimeton 




t* 



r A 



r 





Robert M. Hui 

Fooey! 



Juergen Tonndorf 

We all live in a 
yellow submarine 





William B. Seaman 

"It was obvious ... I don't know why the guys at 
the M.G.H. didn't get it." 








Ralph Schlaeger 

'Well, Ed, you did it again." 

Kent Ellis 

"I Kent do anything Ellis. 




David H. Baker 

"No it's not a bird-headed dwarf." 

Arnold L. Bachman 
"I think that Don Bachman would make a fine ra- 
diology resident." 

62 




Walter E. Berdon 

"From the X-rays, I'd say the kid's 
a schizophrenic." 







William S. Langford 

'All I do is look at the mother. 



Lawrence C. Kolb 

"Personally, I think you need a psychia- 
trist." 




Donald Kornfeld 

"Just call me 'Korny'." 





Robert Michels 
1 always do it under the table. 



Richard Druss 

"Hostility is normal." 




63 



George Wilkie 

'The dean said that long hair is out. 




John W. Fertig 

don't play with numbers since I bet on the Colts. 





Leonard J. Goldwater 

And to think that we actually breathe this air. 




Robert C. Darling 

And when they do come, they 
sleep. 



64 



e pane, 



w 



vv 




SMIt 






% 



■ 



I 



w 
















■hm 




Hi 




_,'Vff*W. 






„: 



:■'. '• '.:: 








I 



THE PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 

IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK 

622 WEST 168TH STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 10032 

TEL: 579.Xl*# 2 1 9 5 



PLEASE DETACH THIS STUB AND 
ENCLOSE WITH REMITTANCE 



! JKtfMtg!i8ffit(HtflS8XSma* 197783? 



529 



FOR SERVICES TO 



$«£S3«XXSSS5SSSfi 



RJ EMI T TANj CI EN O ._ 

JAN 08 1969 



BLUE CROSS 
BENEFITS 



INQUIRY 
NUMBER 



B-0816 



ESTIMATED 72529 



PR 


SUMMARY CHARGES BLUE CROSS CREDITS BALANCE 


EVIOUS STATEMENT 

THIS STATEMENT 612.01 611.80 .21 


TOTAL 612.01 611.80 


.21 








BALANCE DUE §► " , 2 i 




DATE 


SERVICE DESCRIPTION 


CHARGES 


BLUE CROSS 


CREDITS 


12/28 
12/28 
12/28 
12/28 


ROOM 12/28 THRU 12/31 

X-RAY-CHEST 

LABORATORY TEST 

LABORATORY TEST 

LABORATORY TEST 

onnu r»i /ni tudii nwm 


203.00 

22.00 

6.00 

7.00 

3.00 

i sa . nn 


208.00 

22.00 

6.00 

7.00 

3.00 

l SA.nn 







c& 



man cannot Ih 




> %. 




e by bread alone 




The 

Clinical 

Experience 








9% 



1 



■W'Wtll^llwjl 




I 




->-->M 



Eric Frische: "I think it's already 
ten-thirty." 



-» 




A 




'What would you do for the patient now, Dr. Rundles? 




"Guess again, Dr. Rundles." 





"Miss Adler, would you come 
down and demonstrate this 
point?" 




1 



1 



"Where does this go?" 




"Right in there." 



9^ i a Blue Roort 




80 



"Relax, Dr. Long." 




3— ifSfl 




Class Poll 1969 



A poll was distributed in the middle of the fourth year to all classmates in 
New York City at the time. A few were sent to students at Bassett, but none to 
students in Africa. Of 120 students, 105 to 110 probably received polls: 76 
returned completed polls. Most of those failing to turn them in kept silent, but 
some of the non-participants offered excuses which included the following: "It's 
too personal," "I lost it," "It's too much like taking a Pharmacology exam." 
Although some results may not fully represent class opinion because of 
non-participation, the easily measured parameters of sexual and geographic 
distribution among respondents are directly proportional to those of the class as 
a whole. Some of the background information was taken from the class list and 
thus describe the entire class. 



81 



BACKGROUND 

A fair degree of homogeneity is apparent. 
55% of the class are from Northeastern states 
(40% from New York City and environs) and 
another 15% are from the Middle Atlantic 
region. 14% are from the Midwest, 7% from the 
West Coast and Northwest, and 5% from the 
South. Two students come from the Southwest 
and three grew up outside the United States. 

40% of poll respondents grew up in the 
suburbs, 38% in major cities, 15% in cities of 
less than half a million people, and 6% in rural 
areas. 

Nearly 70% of those turning in polls gradu- 
ated from public schools, 14% from boarding 
schools, 12V2% from private day schools, and 
5'/2% from parochial schools. Of the class's 110 
boys, 53% graduated from Ivy League Colleges 
and an additional 20% from other Eastern 
schools. Eight of the eleven girls were drawn 
from the "seven Sister" colleges. 79% of the 
class graduated in 1965. One member 
graduated in 1966 and the rest graduated in or 
after 1958. 



Contrary to traditional beliefs, English was 
only the third most common major (12% of 
respondents) while biology was at the top with 
35%, and chemistry second with 16%. History 
was fourth with 8%, followed by psychology with 
7%. Of the remaining miscellaneous majors, 
10% were in the humanities, 7% in scientific 
and mathematical areas, and 5% in social 
sciences. 

FAMILIES 

10% of poll respondents have no siblings, 
and 39% have only one. 32% have two, 14% 
have 3 and 5% have four. One has five siblings. 
Of those with one sib or more, 50% are first 
children, 40% are second children, and 10% are 
third children. No respondent was a fourth or 
fifth child. 

Although 40% stated the occurrence of some 
significant medical or surgical problem in 
themselves or their immediate families, less 
than one third of those (12% of the total) felt 
that this had influenced their decision to enter 
a medical career. 

A third of our respondents' fathers are from 



Bob Schwarz 



Craig Edmonds 



Bob Dunn 



Dennis Turner 




the business world (including real estate and 
insurance). A quarter are physicians and 3% 
are dentists. 11% are lawyers, 7% are in 
building trades ( from carpenter to architect), 
5% work with their hands (e.g. meat cutter). 4% 
are in civil service (fire department, Post Office) 
and 4% are ministers. The rest are in less 
common fields. 

Over half of the respondent's mothers do not 
work, but several of these do volunteer work. 
15% of the mothers are educators, 8% are 
nurses and 5% are physicians. Other mothers 
are listed as scientist, politician, receptionist, 
factory worker and a wide range of other 
careers. 

54% of the respondents are married, and 
almost all the spouses either study (14%) or 
work (83%). About half of the working wives are 
educators, and 15% are nurses. 10% of spouses 
are either M.D.s or medical students. Among 
the more unusual ways in which wives support 
their med student husbands are as an interior 
decorator, anti-poverty administration worker, 
and investment analyst. 

Although 3% of the respondents claim to 
want no children, no one wants an only child. 



40% want three children, and 27% want two. A 
sixth wants four or more children. An eighth 
has no specific number in mind. 

To control family size, 41% prefer to have the 
wife on contraceptive pills. 16% prefer 
alternating the use of the pill with mechanical 
devices, and 34% prefer mechanical devices 
alone. A daring 5% would use nothing, and one 
respondent advocated rhythm. Another 
supplements pill use with a prayer wheel and 
incense. Interestingly, the reported dangers of 
the pill seem to alarm Northeastern males more 
than those from the rest of the country. Only 
27% of those from the Northeast — married or 
single — would want their wives to rely solely on 
the Pill, while one half the married and three 
fourths of the single boys from the rest of the 
country advocate use of the Pill alone. 

One male and one female respondent feel 
that abortion should be completely outlawed. All 
but one other responding girl felt that it should 
be freely available to any woman desiring it. 
33% of the boys felt it should be available after 
consideration of individual cases, and more 
than 60% thought it should be freely available. 
Several boys are not sure. 



Larry Rosenberg 



Roger Wiederhorn 



Rich Goodin 





The Newells 



The Barskys 




The Budins 






BARD HALL 

More than 85% of the respondents have lived 
in Bard Hall, though less than 10% have stayed 
for 4 years. Most of those who moved out did so 
for more than one reason. These reasons 
included marriage (39%), more space (37%), 
privacy and escape from fellow students (18%), 
facilities to entertain guests (7%) and to 
establish a better rounded way of life (3%). 
Considered the best aspects of Bard Hafl life 
were the convenient location (32%), the 
proximity to other students (24%), the athletic 
facilities (24%). the maid service (15%), the 
single rooms (8%), and the social and 
extracurricular activities (6%). The worst single 
aspect mentioned was the food (37%). 40% 
complained about the atmosphere, which was 
variably described as "immature", "reg- 
imented", "monastic", "noisy", "boring", 
"too communal", "lonely", and "impersonal". 
Other objections were the "shared hang-ups" 
of "compulsive medical students", the "lack 
of freedom", the "general dormitory 
environment", and the "feeling of being 
watched by G. A. P." An additional 7% did not 
like living with only medical students. 26% had 
objections to the physical plant: almost V2 of 
these were to the small size of the rooms, and 
5% objected to the elevators. Miscellaneous 
architectural complaints related to communal 
bathrooms, inadequate heat, connecting doors 
between rooms, and unattractiveness of the 
dining room. 

Several students felt entertaining in Bard was 
impossible, one objected to the quality of the 
maid service, one objected to the lack of private 
cooking facilities, and one declared that aside 
from location of athletic facilities, everything 
about Bard Hall was terrible. 

Drawing my own inferences from the results, 
I feel that the bad aspects of the Bard Hall 
atmosphere will be perpetuated in the proposed 
married-students dorms, because of the strict 
and highly artificial segregation of students 
from faculty and house staff. I and a number of 
other married students feel that the planning 
committee made a serious mistake with this 
arrangement, which is in the same spirit as the 
separate entrances and non-communicating 
facilities planned for the gymnasium on the 
downtown campus. 




George Berakha 



Josie Yeh 



Ruth 





Beautiful Washington Heights 



Anne Moore 



ENTERTAINMENT 



Reme's is the most popular local establishment, 
preferred over all others by 26% of the voters. Carvel 
and Luigi's tie for second with 18% each. 7% go 
most often to Nelson's, The Silver Palm, Gold Medal, 
Armory Bar and Grill, Oak Tavern, and Tropical 
Gardens each draw a few per cent. 8% prefer to 
avoid all neighborhood hang-outs. 



Of P&S club activities, swimming is most popular, 
enjoyed by 51% of the voters. Basketball and squash 
tie for second. Class shows and Christmas parties are 
tied for third, and these are followed in order by 
tennis, the Arts Festival, the dark room, and the 
choir. Other activities have only scattered par- 
ticipation. 



Our Musicians 






Peter 

Moskovitz 



The Plague 



Roger 
Goettsche 




SWIMMING: Charlie Stevenson 
Martin Wolferstan 



HUNTING: Chuck Jackson 



The Class Athletes 



SKIING: 
John Mazzulo 



Wally Merriam 
David Berke 



Jack Edelen 
John Birkhoff 



I 




Movies are extremely popular. 57% of the 
voters saw more than five movies within the 
preceding 12 months, other than those shown 
at Bard Hall, and only 7% had seen none at all. 
However, 60% attended no movies at Bard Hall, 
and most of those who had seen movies at 
Bard had gone to only one or two. 

Museums and art galleries drew most of the 
voters at least twice a year. Broadway plays 
drew just over 75% at least once. Concerts drew 
nearly 70%, usually just once, and zoos and 
Off-Broadway plays each drew two thirds of the 
voters at least once. Operas were attended by 
62%, and those who went usually went more 
than once and frequently more than half a 
dozen times. 

Sporting events were poorly attended. College 
games drew 43%, but the most popular 
professional sport was baseball, which drew less 
than 23%. 

Other activities cited by individuals included 
attending the ballet and the circus, going 
hunting, and refinishing antique furniture. 





HABITS 

We are a pretty restrained lot. 60% of the poll 
respondents use no tobacco at all. Of those who 
do, more than half smoke a pipe in addition to, 
or instead of, cigars and cigarettes. 12% of the 
respondents smoke cigars: one third of these 
smoke one or more per day, and all but one of 
the remainder smoke one or less per week. 13% 
smoke cigarettes, but of these, two thirds 
smoke one half pack per day or less, and the 
heaviest smoker consumes only IV2 packs per 
day. None of the female respondents use 
tobacco. 

4% of the respondents shun alcohol, 54% 
limit their consumption to one or two drinks at 
parties. 15% generally drink wine only; 10% 
drink beer primarily. 17% prefer hard liquor, 
14% of these consuming one half to one pint 
per week, 2% consuming less, and 1% 
consuming more. All of the girls drink only one 
or two drinks at parties. 

13% admit to smoking marijuana, but several 
of these point out that they have smoked it only 
infrequently. Half of these smokers are from 
the Northeast. Of the others, one is from the 
Northwest, and others from the West Coast, 
nterestingly, all the Northeastern marijuana 
smokers also smoke tobacco, while only one of 
the others does. No one admits to using 
amphetamines or LSD. None of the girls have 
smoked marijuana. 







READING 

While 12% receive no medical journals at all, 77% 
receive the New England Journal. The Annals of 
Internal Medicine is received by 21%. JAMA, Lancet, 
Disease-A-Month, and the American Journal of 
Medicine each have a few readers. Eighteen other 
medical journals are read by one or two voters. 

Time is the most commonly read non-medical 
magazine, with 43% of the voters subscribing to it. 
New Republic is second with 16%; Life and New 
York follow with 13 J /2%. The New Yorker comes to 
10%, Newsweek to 8%. Cue and the New York 
Review of Books each come to 6%. 5% get Scientific 
American and 5% get U.S. News and World Report. 
56 other magazines are read by one or more class 
members, including Playboy and Sports Illustrated, 
a number of art magazines, several religious 
publications, a few technical journals, and many 
magazines aimed at hobbies such as skiing, home 
decorating, hi-fi, photography, television-watching 
and travel. 

Almost everyone claimed to read a number of 
non-medical books each year, many averaging 
nearly a book per month. 



BUYING: Leland Dobbs 
STUDYING: Bob Bethel 
SLEEPING: Sandy Lieber 







*<** 



vV-* 



A 




:o^\ 



POLITICAL OPINIONS 

48% of respondents are registered 
Democrats, 22% registered Republicans, 22% 
unregistered, and 4% registered Independents, 
Two students are registered Conservatives and 
one is a registered Liberal. 57% voted for 
Humphrey last November, 15% for Nixon, two 
students for McCarthy, and for Eldridge Cleaver. 
24% did not vote. 

43% believe their fathers voted for 
Humphrey, 46% for Nixon, 7% for no one, one 
father for Eldridge Cleaver, and one father for 
Dick Gregory. Of the mothers, 48% were 
thought to have voted for Humphrey, 45% for 
Nixon, and 5% for no one. 

Of the candidates on the scene in the spring 
of 1968, Robert Kennedy was the favorite 
choice for president, winning approval from 
34% of the respondents. McCarthy was almost 
as popular with 32%. Rockefeller was supported 
by 21%, Nixon by 5% , and Humphrey by 4%. 
Two students preferred McGovern and one liked 
Romney. 

The respondents seem somewhat more 
dove-ish than hawk-ish. Only 4% favor a 
decisive military victory in Vietnam, 19% 
advocate a strong military position plus 
negotiations. 41% support a military slowdown 
plus negotiations, and 36% want immediate 
and complete withdrawal. 

Only one-third of the class has ever picketed, 
but some of those who have picketed have done 
so for more than one cause. Nearly 
three-quarters of those picketing have done so 
for peace, and 60% have done so for Civil 
Rights. 2 respondents have joined 
demonstrations against Columbia University, 
and 2 others for other causes. 








! 

» - 




The class meeting will now come to order. 



RELIGION 

Half of the respondents are involved in some 
form of organized religion. 20% practice 
Judaism, 20% Protestantism, and 10% 
Catholicism. Only 30% do not plan to involve 
their children in religion. 55% definitely plan 
to, and 15% are undecided. 




80 


% 


78.5% 


77 


% 


72 


% 


65 


% 


58 


% 


49 


% 



CURRICULUM AND ADMINISTRATION 

The desirability of a number of possible changes 
at P&S was as follows, in order of class preference: 

More elective time 

Earlier introduction of clinical material 

Student on-call rooms 

Less lab time in first two years 

More emergency room experience 

Greater use of faculty advisers 

Less scut on the wards 
Other suggested changes included "free meals to 
students on call in 3rd and 4th years", "first-aid 
course instead of 2nd year surgery", and a number 
of requests for seminars, tutorials, and a wider use 
of preceptors. 

70% of voters support a "radical change in 
curriculum" at P&S, while the remaining 30% are 
reasonably happy with the current curriculum. While 
about 47% feel that the administration is too 
concerned with aspects of a student's 
non-academic life such appearance, many of these 
voters already wear sideburns, and only 7% felt 
prevented by administrative censure from wearing 
beards. 

34% felt that the administration is justifiably 
concerned with matters such as dress. 16% feel 
that the administration should show greater concern 
for the non-academic life of its students. 



REGISTRATION: John Birkoff 
Peter Workum 



COURSE EVALUATIONS 

Courses were ranked by preference for each year. 

First Year: Physiology was unapproached by any 
other course for popularity, receiving two thirds of 
the votes for first place and no votes for last place. 
The differences between the other four courses 
were not great. Biochemistry and Neuroanatomy 
were tied for second, but while Biochemistry's votes 
fell mostly into third and fourth preferences, 
Neuranatomy's votes were split between second 
and last place and were sometimes accompanied by 
vehemently negative comments. 

Gross Anatomy and Histology were not far behind 
Biochem. and Neuro. Like Neuro., Gross's votes 
included high and low preferences, while those for 
Histology were less vigorously pro or con. 



Tony 



Second Year: Pharmacology was very clearly 
chosen as the best course in the second year, 
despite a significant number of low votes. Pathology 
was second, and Clinical Pathology was not far 
behind. Parasitology ranked fourth with a number 
of vigorous defenders and some vocal detractors. 
Physical Diagnosis was fifth, with Introductory 
Surgery close behind, and Microbiology was last, 
though by little. 

Third Year: The runaway favorite was Medicine, 
although its popularity was not universal. Pediatrics 
and Neurology were tied for second place. 
Psychiatry followed, with Orthopedics not far 
behind. Surgery was next. Significantly below 
Surgery came Anesthesiology. Dermatology was 
another large step lower. ENT and Opthalmology, 
respectively, had almost no defenders at all, and 
Public Health was overwhelmingly chosen as the 
worst course of the third year by 75% of the voters. 

Fourth Year: Medicine was, again the favorite, 
and surgery jumped from fifth to a close second 
place, apparently indicating a distinct preference by 
the class for ward participation rather than for the 
relatively passive learning methods of the third year 
course. Group Clinic was third. Pediatrics was a 
close fourth, but this did not indicate a fall in 
popularity so much as a redistribution of votes for 
other courses. 53% ranked third year peds either 
1st, 2nd, or 3rd of eleven courses, while 61% 
ranked fourth year peds either 1st, 2nd, or 3rd of 
eleven courses. 

Radiology was fifth, and though a strong favorite 
with few, was generally well recieved. Ob-gyn was 



sixth and, though highly rated by some, received 
more last place votes .than any other fourth year 
course. (Possibly by those assigned to 16 East?) 
Fourth year Orthopedics dropped to seventh from 
fourth place, receiving no votes for 1st or 2nd place, 
while the third year course had been put 1st or 2nd 
by 21% of the class. Differential Diagnosis was 
eighth, with a wide range of reactions. Urology was 
ninth, receiving no votes for first or last place, but 
being ranked everywhere in between. 

Psychiatry dropped from a popular third to an 
unpopular tenth place. Dermatology dropped from a 
solid seventh to the cellar. 

Overall, third year Medicine and Physiology were 
the two most popular courses, and Pharmacology 
was also well liked. No course in the entire 
curriculum challenged Public Health for last place. 
(Even Dr. Trussell jumped off the sinking ship.) The 
rise in popularity of Surgery and the fall of 
Orthopedics, Psychiatry, and Dermatology probably 
reflect reaction to the different teaching methods 
used in different years. 

SUPPLEMENTARY ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES 

CPCs were of greatest interest to students in our 
class. Team rounds were nearly as popular. 
Combined Clinics were considered by some to be 
too technical or too repetitive of course material. 
Medical History lectures were appreciated by a few, 
but many students never went, and some had never 
heard of them. 



John 
Kay 



Jeff 
Weisberg 



John 
Glick 



Mitch 
Goldman 



Joel 
Budin 



Juan 
Garcia 




CAREER 



Nearly 37% of classmates who voted anticipate a 
career in internal medicine. 28% plan to enter 
surgery, and half of these have chosen specialties 
(8% ■ orthopedics, 4% neurosurgery, 2% plastic 
surgery). 

Psychiatry will draw 12% of the class, about one 
fourth of these specializing in child psychiatry. 5% 
of the voters plan to enter pediatrics. 

Of the remaining 14 students 2 are undecided, 
and 2 each plan to enter ophthalmology, pathology, 
and radiology. One each plans to enter anes- 
thesiology, obstetrics, neurology, general practice, 
family medicine, and community medicine. 

Only 13% plan full-time private practice, and 
more than half of these plan to practice in a group. 
An additional 15% plan full-time academic careers. 

56% expect to be part-time academic; 43% will 
also do part-time private practice and 20% will do 
part time research (2 students hope to do some of 
all three). Half of those planning part-time practice 
expect to do so as part of a group. One student 
plans to work full-time in community medicine 
clinics, and three expect to do this on a part-time 
basis. 




Over 65% of the voting students want to practice 
in a city of more than half a million people. 3% 
want to split city and suburban practice. 20% want 
to practice in cities of 100,000 to 500,000 and 12% 
prefer a city of less than 100,000 

One third of the class expects to join the AMA, 
one eighth expects not to, and half the class is 
undecided. However, only 12% would definitely join 
if membership were not advantageous for obtaining 
such things as malpractice insurance; 47% would 
definitely not join, and 40% would be undecided. 

20% of the class would like to intern at 
Presbyterian Hospital, while only 10% would go to 
Massachusetts General if guaranteed placement 
were available. 6% would choose Beth Israel in 
Boston, 5% Moffitt, and 4% San Francisco General. 
Boston Children's University of Colorado, Harlem, 
Rochester, and Roosevelt were the choice of two 
students. 20% of the class chose hospitals chosen 
by no others. For 22V2%, the mind so boggled at the 
thought of guaranteed placement, that it was 
incapable of a decision. 



Actual internships were chosen on the basis 
of a large number of factors. Most important 
was a good medical school affiliation. Good 
hospital facilities, and the friendliness and 
morale of the staff were the second most 
important considerations. Location of the 
hospital in a large city or in a particular city was 
the third factor; over half of those considering 
location important wanted to be in New York. 
Boston and San Francisco each appealed to 
14%; the rest were widely scattered. A good 
on-call schedule (less often than every other 
night) was in fourth place; a good salary was 
fifth. Emphasis on acute medicine and/or 
trauma was sixth. Less important factors, listed 
in order, included: minimal scut, important 
affiliation for future private practice, good local 
facilities for family, convenience for spouse's 
place of business, and the availability of a 
particular program. Two students specifically 
sought responsibility in an internship. 

COMPARISON 

Comparing our results to those of the class 
above, our rate of poll return is similar. Our 
geographic distribution is slightly broader (only 
70% of our class is from the East Coast as 
opposed to 80% of the Class of 1968.) A 
marriage rate of 54% has not varied from last 
year. More of our class's wives are educators 



Bill 
Abernathy 



Mike 
Newell 



Mrs. 
Townsend 





I 



George 
Saari 



Bill 
Tucker 



and 2% more are nurses. We want smaller 
families — only 17% rather than 36% want 
more than three children — but we are less 
enthusiastically controlling family size with the 
Pill. 

Although 80% of our class wants more 
elective time, 91% of the previous class wanted 
it. While we agreed with our predecessors that 
Medicine instruction was good, we were much 
less satisfied with Microbiology and 
Dermatology and more enthusiastic about 
Physiology and Pharmacology. 

Our class reads more non-medical books. 
More of us read the New England Journal of 
Medicine. And while the New Yorker is still read 
by 10%, it is now in fourth rather than second 
place, surpassed this year by the New Republic, 
Life, and New York. Playboy's popularity has 
dropped substantially. 

Fewer of us smoke cigarettes, and those who 
smoke, smoke fewer per day than those just 
above us. Either we are much more cautious or 
much bigger liars with respect to drug use than 
those in the class of 1968, as only half as many 
students admitted smoking marijuana in our 
class. 

We have more Democrats, fewer Republicans, 
and many more religiously active students than 
the class above us. We seem to have a few 
more doves and fewer picketers. We are more 
overwhelmingly in favor of some form of 
legalized abortion. We are at least as distrustful 
of the AMA. 



CONCLUSION 



We have sometimes thought of ourselves as a 
more compulsive and less frivolous class than 
the one above us. Most of us feel more 
conservative than the hairier and more vocal 
students in the classes below. In the second year 
we felt like the most unlucky class — we enjoyed 
neither the stability of the old labs nor the 
convenience of the new, but we instead the 
school's foster children, shunted from hall to 
closet; we did, however, get a last glimpse of 



Goldwater and Bellevue. After our four years 
here, many of us will choose to remain if 
possible, and many more will stay nearby, in New 
York City's other hospitals. Although Columbia 
cannot expect to please all of her students all of 
the time, very few, if any of us, will regret that we 
spent four years of our lives here listening, 
watching, and beginning to learn what it means 
to be a doctor. 





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9 



11 



H 



S 



Vi 



t 



i 




WALTER WICHERN: And you get 6 hours off for 
Christmas and New Years. 




FREDERICK AMENDOLA: It's 

been growing from my umbilicus 
for over two years. 




My wife thinks I'm working. 





Mark, since there are three hemorrhoidal veins 
on the left, why are there two on the right. 




Go somewhere obscure, Vincent, perhaps Minne- 
sota. 

100 




DONALD MILLER 
and IAN REISS: We 

just did a 
thoracodocho- 




GREGOR JAMESON: Baby, 
Baby, Can't You Hear My Heart 
Beat? 





NICHOLAS P. CHRISTY: Rodin? Never heard ot 
it. 




Dear Lilly: I have lost my stethoscope. 



This SUBintern ordered BP q 45 sec! 




cnoledocho- 
uretero-eustacho- 
ventriculo-ileo 
anastomosis! 




MICHAEL LISANTI, CARL LUDWIG, and 
WILLIAM FRIEND: That's 2 regular and 1 black, 
Liebowitz. 101 






Charles A. Ragan 

"Next year I'm going on strike' 





A 




102 








Rejane M. Harvey and 
Cecil G. Marquez 
"Come, I'll show you where we read 
them" 



103 



''"'' '-"""' 






MARY IMOGENE BASSETT HOSPITAL 



UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO MEDICAL CENTER 




THIS PAGE IS DEDICATED TO THOSE 
WHO TRAVELED NEAR AND FAR IN 
QUEST OF . . . 



GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 





UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF CLEVELAND 



104 



FRANCIS DELAFIELD HOSPITAL 



AVE ATQUE VALE 
H. HOUSTON MERRITT, M.D. 

Ave, students of the Class of 1969. Hail to you who have successfully 
weathered the storms of four years of anatomy, biochemistry, physiology and 
many other erudite subjects. 

Vale, students of Class of 1969. Farewell to you who are leaving these 
sheltered confines to start your career in medicine. For most of you this will be 
internal medicine, general surgery or one of the specialties. For some of you, it 
will be research. For all of you, I hope it will also be a lifetime devoted to the 
transmission of your knowledge to future generations of students. You may 
recall that this is one of the clauses in the Hippocratic Oath which you will soon 
take. 

If you are surprised at the emphasis that I am placing on the role of teaching 
in your life, let me remind you of the shortage of physicians in this and many 
other countries throughout the world, and the need for teachers to educate 
them. 

The increased demand for teachers in medical education is due to many 
factors. One of these is the evolution of the system of medical education in the 
United States. In colonial days the education of a physician was scant indeed 
and consisted mainly of an apprenticeship. The first medical schools, 
established in the sixth decade of the seventeenth century, were patterned after 
those of Scotland, England and Western Europe. Instruction, mainly by lectures 
and demonstration to large classes, required few teachers. In fact, medical 
education was such a prosperous business that in the last half of the nineteenth 
century, there were more than 400 so-called medical schools in the United 
States. However, early in this century, there was a great reform, spurred on by 
the formation of the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical 
Association and the thorough study by Abraham Flexner in 1910. Dr. Flexner 
emphasized the need for libraries, laboratories and a full-time faculty in the 
basic sciences. Approximately a decade later the Rockefeller Foundation recog- 
nized the need and gave financial support for full-time members of the faculty 
in the clinical departments. Following World War II funds for research became 
available from the Federal Government through the National Institutes of 
Health, thus making research an integral and important part of medical 
education. 



106 



Each one of these advances in medical education has caused an increase in 
the size of the faculty. In the past twenty years the size of the full-time and 
part-time faculties of our schools has more than doubled. 

Two additional factors have caused increased demands 'for more medical 
teachers. The first of these is the establishment of new medical schools and the 
increase in the enrollment in existing schools. More than a dozen new medical 
schools have been opened in the past ten years and the enrollment in the 
entering classes of older schools has increased approximately ten per cent. 

Perhaps the greatest factor in the increased demand for teachers is the 
radical revision of the curriculum which is being adopted by many schools. The 
medical curriculum which was established in the latter part of the nineteenth 
century remained relatively unchanged for almost fifty years. In the past few 
years an entirely new concept of medical education has developed which is 
directed toward a reduction in the length of time devoted to the traditional 
courses and the introduction of many elective courses. The purpose of the new 
curriculum is to give the individual student a much greater latitude in 
developing his own talents and interests. At the same time it allows the student 
to correlate the basic and clinical sciences in a manner which will be more 
meaningful to him. It is obvious that this requires individualization of teaching 
and many more teachers. 

Although you have not been exposed to this new curriculum you have worked 
with the faculty in the planning of this experiment in medical education and will 
have the opportunity of participating in it as an intern, resident or member of 
the faculty. We sincerely hope that your four years at P&S have instilled in you 
the desire to continue your education and to participate in the education of 
future generations of students throughout your whole career. 

It is with mixed feelings that I bid farewell to the Class of 1969. I rejoice with 
you in your completion of the first great lap in your medical education. I regret 
that I did not get to know you better, and that my contact with you at the 
bedside of the patient was not as great as I would like for it to have been. 

HHM:Mjs 
12/5/68 



107 



iTOEftTCS^rPS 



William S. Abernathy 


Medicine 


University of Kansas Medical Center 




Kansas City, Kansas 




David J. Adams 


Rotating 


University of Washington 




Affiliated Hospitals 




Seattle, Washington 




Donald, M. Bachman 


Surgery 


Presbyterian Hospital 




New York, New York 




William E. Benson 


Medicine 


Presbyterian Hospital 




New York, New York 




George J. Berakha 


Medicine 


Johns Hopkins Hospital 




Baltimore, Maryland 




David K. Berke 


Medicine 


Presbyterian Hospital 




New York. New York 




Carol D. A. Berkowitz 


Pediatrics 


Roosevelt Hospital 




New York, New York 




David M. Berkowtiz 


Medicine 


Roosevelt Hospital 




New York, New York 




Robert A. Bethel 


Medicine 


Harlem Hospital 




New York, New York 




John P. Bilezikian 


Medicine 


Presbyterian Hospital 




New York, New York 




Sophie B. Bilezikian 


Medicine 


St. Luke's Hospital 




New York, New York 




John D. Birkhoff 


Surgery 


University of Chicago Clinics 




Chicago, Illinois 




Michael Borecky 


Medicine 


Roosevelt Hospital 




New York, New York 




Susan E. Botsford 


Mixed 


Harlem Hospital 




New York, New York 




Malcolm M. Brown 


Pediatrics 


Children's Medical Center 




Boston Massachusetts 




John H. Buckner 


Surgery 


Harlem Hospital 




New York, New York 




Joel A. Budin 


Surgery 


Presbyterian Hospital 




New York. New York 




Donald L. Buehler 


Surgery 


Stanford University Affiliated Hospitals 




Palo Alto, California 




Michael B. Bunim 


Medicine 


Kaiser Foundation 




San Francisco, California 




Robert W. Bunting 


Rotating 


Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 




Hanover, New Hampshire 




Henry E. Butler III 


Surgery 


Kaiser Foundation 




San Francisco, California 




Paul E. Cohart 


Medicine 


Mount Sinai Hospital 




New York, New York 




Kenneth G. Cousens 


Mixed 


Mount Zion Hospital 




San Francisco, California 




Edward V. Cox III 


Medicine 


Mount Sinai Hospital 




New York. New York 




William E. Crouch III 


Medicine 


Roosevelt Hospital 




New York, New York 




Rollin K. Daniel 


Surgery 


Barnes Hospital 




St. Louis, Missouri 




Peter B. Davol 


Medicine 


St. Luke's Hospital 




New York, New York 




Peter A. De Gregorio 


Mixed 


Harlem Hospital 




New York. New York 




Leland G. Dobbs 


Medicine 


Presbyterian Hospital 




New York, New York 




Robert N. Dunn 


Surgery 


Roosevelt Hospital 




New York, New York 





Michael W. Eaton Surgery 

Boston City Hospital (Tufts) 

Boston. Massachusetts 

John S. Edelen Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, New York 

Craig Edmonds Rotating 

Kaiser Foundation 

San Francisco, California 

Donald A. Feinfeld Medicine 

Harlem Hospital 

New York. New York 

Jeffrey R. Fisher Medicine 

Harlem Hospital 

New York. New York 

Richard L. Fraioli Mixed 

Naval Hospitals — St- Alban's 

New York 

Eric E. Frische Rotating 

King County Hospital 

Seattle. Washington 

Carol Garvey Mixed 

Washington Hospital Center 

Washington. D.C. 

Glenda Garvey Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York. New York 

John H. Glick Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York. New York 

Roger L. Goetische, Jr. Mixed Medicine 

Presbyterian-Pacific Medical Center 

San Francisco. California 

Mitchell A. Goldman Mixed 

Harlem Hospital 

New York, New York 

Steven P. Goldsmith Medicine 

Boston Veterans Administration Hos. 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Richard C. Goodin Medicine 

Harlem Hospital 

New York, New York 

Eugene W. Green, Jr. Medicine 

Barnes Hospital 

St. Louis, Missouri 

Thomas Gualtieri Surgery 

Royal Victoria 

Montreal, Canada 

Laurance J. Guido Surgery 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, New York 

Thomas M. Hanson Medicine 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, New York 

John W. Harmon Surgery 

Vth Surgical (Harvard) 

Boston City Hospital 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Chesley C. Herbert Medicine 

Harlem Hospital 

New York, New York 

Pietr Hitzig Medicine 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York, New York 

Robert N. Holtzman Mixed 

Harlem Hospital 

New York, New York 

John S. Hood Surgery 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, New York 

Charles G. Jackson, Jr. Mixed 

Harlem Hospital 

New York, New York 

Conrade C. Jaffe Medicine 

San Diego County University Hospital 

San Diego, California 

Lynne L. Johnson Medicine 

Harlem Hospital 

New York. New York 

Mark E. Josephson Medicine 

Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York, New York 

Neil B. Kavey Medicine 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New York. New York 

Jon A. Kay Mixed 

Harlem Hospital 

New York. New York 



Robert C. Kiess Surgery 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital 

Cooperstown. New York 

Mark C. Lambert Medicine 

University of California Hospitals 

San Francisco, California 

Robert G. Lattes Mixed 

Harlem Hospital 

New York. New York 

Virginia A. Li Volsi Pathology 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York. New York 

William A. Lieber Surgery 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York. New York 

Jerome H. Liebowitz Mixed 

Mount Zion Hospital 

San Francisco. California 

Robert W. Lisle Mixed 

St. Vincent's Hospital 

New York, New York 

James T. Long Rotating 

Los Angeles County General Hospital 

Los Angeles. California 

Roger A. Lundquist Surgery 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York. New York 

Richard A. Maun Mixed Surgery 

San Francisco General Hospital 

San Francisco. California 

John M. Mazzullo IN Medicine 

Harlem Hospital 

New York. New York 

Carlos Menendez Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York. New York 

Walter W. Merriam Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York. New York 

Christopher Michelsen Surgery 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York. New York 

Anne Moore Medicine 

New York Hospital 

New York. New York 

Peter A. Moskovitz Surgery 

George Washington General Hospital 

Washington, D.C. 

Irwin Nash Pathology 

Yale New Haven Medical Center 

New Haven, Connecticut 

Michael E. Newell Surgery 

San Diego County University Hospital 

San Diego. California 

Olufemi 0. Ogundipe Mixed Medicine 

Montefiore Hospital 

New York, New York 

David S. C. Pao Medicine 

George Washington University Hospital 

Washington, D.C. 

Charles M. Peterson Medicine 

Harlem Hospital 

New York. New York 

John W. Polachek Medicine 

Montreal General Hospital 

Montreal. Canada 

James A. Pollack Pediatrics 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Trevor R. P. Price Medicine 

University of California Hospitals 

San Francisco. California 

Andrew C. Przybyla Medicine 

Bronx-Lebanon Hospital 

New York. New York 

Andrew R. Pulito Surgery 

University of Virginia Hospital 

Charlottesville, Virginia 

William W. Reichert Rotating 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 

Hanover, New Hampshire 

James A. Reiffel Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, New York 

Robert J. Reza Medicine 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York. New York 

Dorothy A. Rollefson Medicine 

Bernalillo County Hospital 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 



Lawrence E, Rosenberg 

San Francisco General Hospital 

San Francisco, California 

Arthur R. Rosenglick 

Harlem Hospital 

New York, New York 

Charlotte Rundles 

Bellevue-New York University Hospital 

New York, New York 

George J. Saari 

King County Hospital 

Seattle, Washington 

Anthony G. Santomauro 

Passavant Memorial Hospital 

Chicago, Illinois 

Robert D. Schwarz 

Royal Victoria Hospital 

Montreal. Canada 

Thomas P. Sculco 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, New York 

Steven L. Sholem 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York. New York 

William H. Southwick 

Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital 

Cooperstown, New York 

Demetrius Stasiuk 

Los Angeles County General Hospital 

Los Angeles, California 

Allen C. Steere, Jr. 

St. Lukes Hospital 

New York, New York 

Charles S. Stevenson 

St Luke's Hospital 

New York. New York 

Walter H. Stingle 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York, New York 

Jeffrey D. Thorley 

Bernalillo County Hospital 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Kenneth M. Tittle 

Beth Isreal Hospital 

Boston. Massachusetts 

Robert P. Titzler 

Hennepin County General Hospital 

Minneapolis. Minnesota 

William M. Tucker 

Roosevelt Hospital 

New York. New York 

Dennis Turner 

Harlem Hospital 

New York. New York 

Roger P. Vincent 

University of Minneapolis Hospital 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Samuel Weinstein 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, New York 

Jeffrey A. Weisberg 

Mount Sinai Hospital 

New York. New York 

Albert K. Weyman 

Strong Memorial Hospital 

Rochester. New York 

A. Roger Wiederhorn 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, New York 

John C. Williams 

University of Pennsylvania Hospital 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Hugh D. Wilson 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 

Hanover, New Hampshire 

Martin Wolferstan 

Charity Tulane Div. Hospital 

New Orleans, Louisiana 

Fifhld Workum, Jr. 

Bernalillo County Hospital 

Albuquerque. New Mexico 

John V. Wylie 

Presbyterian Hospital 

New York, New York 

Josephine C. Yen 

IVth George Washington University Hos. 

Washington, D.C. 

Billy G. Yount, Jr. 

University of Chicago Clinics 

Chicago. Illinois 



Mixed Medical 
Medicine 
Medicine 
Rotating 
Medicine 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Mixed Surgery 
Medicine 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Medicine 
Medicine 
Rotating 
Mixed 
Mixed 
Medicine 
Pediatrics 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Medicine 
Surgery 
Mixed Surgery 
Surgery 
Medicine 
Medicine 



alpha omega alpha 




Alpha Omega Alpha is a national medical honor society whose members are 
elected on the basis of scholarship and character. The society's motto, "To be 
worthy to serve the suffering," embodies the spirit of the organization. 



elected members 



May, 1968: 



November 1967 



William Edmunds Benson 
Joel Aryeh Budin 
Donald Lyle Buehler 
Glenda Josephine Garvey 
James Andrew Reiffei 
Dorothy Ann Rollefson 



David Kenneth Berke 
Carol Adler Berkowitz 
John Paul Bilezikian 
Malcolm Michael Brown 
Edmund Vermilye Cox, III 
John S. Edelen 
John Watson Harmon 
Marc Eric Josephson 
Carlos Eugenio Menendez 
Walter Woodhull Merriam 
Lawrence Elliot Rosenberg 
Walter H. Stingle, II 
Roger Phillips Vincent 



no 



class officers 



Fourth Year 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

P. & S. Club Representative 



Malcolm M. Brown 
John S. Edelen 
Anne Moore 

Christopher B. Michelsen 
Jerome H. Liebowitz 



Third Year 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

P. & S. Club Representative 



Jon Kay 

Richard A. Maun 
Malcolm M. Brown 
Jerome H. Liebowitz 



Second Year 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

P. & S. Club Representative 



Jeffrey Fisher 
Robert N. Dunn 
Richard Goodin 
Michael Newell 
Jerome H. Liebowitz 



First Year 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

P. & S. Club Representative 



Jeffrey Fisher 
Mark Josephson 
Lynne Johnson 
Robert N. Dunn 
Jerome H. Liebowitz 



in 



WILLIAM SHERWOOD 
ABERNATHY 

Omaha, Nebraska 
B.A., Grinnell, 1965 



ARTHUR JOSEPH 
BARSKY, III 

New York, New York 
B.A., Williams, 1964 



DAVID JAMES ADAMS 

New York, New York 
B.S., Rochester, 1965 



WILLIAM EDMUNDS 
BENSON 

Waterbury, Connecticut 
B.A., Yale, 1965 



DONALD MARK BACHMAN 

New York, New York 
B.A., Columbia, 1965 



GEORGE JOSEPH BERAKHA 

New York, New York 
B.S., Columbia, 1965 




^r 



DAVID KENNETH BERKE 

Forest Hills, New York 
B.A., Columbia, 1965 




ROBERT ARTHUR BETHEL 

Rome, Georgia 
B.S., Davidson, 1965 



CAROL ADLER BERKOWITZ 

Brooklyn. New York 
B.A., Barnard, 1965 




JOHN PAUL BILEZIKIAN 

Newtonville, Massachusetts 
B.A., Harvard, 1965 




DAVID MARK BERKOWITZ 

Brooklyn, New York 
B.A., Hobart, 1965 



SOPHIE BALLARD BILEZIKIAN 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Radcliffe, 1965 




*" , " ii *^i; 




JOHN DAVID BIRKHOFF 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 
B.A., Harvard, 1964 



C. BRUCE BROWN, JR. 

Rockport, Massachusetts 
B.A., Bowdoin, 1965 



MICHAEL BORECKY 

Denver, Colorado 
B.A., Wesleyan, 1965 



MALCOLM MICHAEL BROWN 

Mamaroneck, New York 
B.A., Harvard, 1965 



SUSAN ELIZABETH 
BOTSFORD 

New York, New York 
B.A., Mount Holyoke, 1964 



JOHN HERMAN BUCKNER 

White River Jet., Vermont 
B.A., Dartmouth, 1966 



JOEL ARYEH BUDIN 

Rockaway Park, New York 
B.A., Columbia, 1965 



PAUL EDWARD COHART 

New Haven, Connecticut 
B.A., Yale, 1965 



DONALD LYLE BUEHLER 

Fremont, California 
B.A., Stanford, 1964 



KENNETH GABRIEL 
COUSENS 

Highland Park, Illinois 
B.A., Amherst, 1965 



MICHAEL BEN BUNIM 

Chevy Chase, Maryland 
B.A., Haverford, 1965 



EDWARD VERMILYE COX, III 

Oyster Bay, New York 
B.A., Yale, 1965 





WILLIAM E. CROUCH, III 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Princeton, 1965 



■ E ■ 



PETER A. DEGREGORIO 



Yonkers, New York 
B.S., Fordham, 1965 



ROLLIN KIMBALL DANIEL 

Montgomery, Alabama 
B.A., Vanderbilt, 1965 



ROBERT N. DUNN 

Rutherford, New Jersey 
B.A., Harvard, 1965 



PETER BRADFORD DAVOL 

Concord, Massachusetts 
B.A., Harvard, 1964 





\ 



MICHAEL WINFRED EATON 



Orinda, California 
B.A., California, 1965 




JOHN S. EDELEN 

Grosse Pointe, Michigan 
B.A., Wesleyan, 1965 



JEFFREY ROBERT FISHER 

Birmingham, Michigan 
B.A., Princeton, 1965 



CRAIG EDMONDS 

Baltimore, Maryland 
B.A., Harvard, 1964 



RICHARD LORETO FRAIOLI 

Schenectady, New York 
B.S., Union, 1965 



DONALD ALLEN FEINFELD 

Rye, New York 

B.A., Rochester, 1965 



JANE ELIOT FRIED 

Brewster, New York 
B.A., Vassar, 1964 



ERIC ERNST FRISCHE 

Glen Head, New York 
B.A., Stanford, 1965 



JOHN HARRISON GLICK 

New York, New York 
B.A., Princeton, 1965 



CAROL WILSON GARVEY 

Baltimore, Maryland 
B.A., Radcliffe, 1963 



ROGER LYMAN 
GOETTSCHE, JR. 

Wilmette, Illinois 
B.A., Yale, 1965 



GLENDA JOSEPHINE 
GARVEY 

New York, New York 
B.A., Wellesley, 1964 



MITCHELL ALAN GOLDMAN 

Bayside, New York 
B.A., Queens, 1965 





c 



STEVEN PAUL GOLDSMITH 

New York, New York 
B.A., Syracuse, 1965 



LAURANCE JACOBIUS GUIDO 

Great Neck, New York 
B.A., Columbia, 1965 



RICHARD CARLYSLE GOODIN 

Corona, New York 
B.A., Dartmouth, 1965 



THOMAS MICHAEL HANSON 

Rye, New York 
B.A., Dartmouth, 1965 



EUGENE WILLARD 
GREEN, JR. 

Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Washington and Lee, 1965 



JOHN W. HARMON 

Scarsdale, New York 
B.A., Harvard, 1965 







CHESLEY CARLISLE 
HERBERT, III 

Gastonia, North Carolina 
B.A., Duke, 1965 



PIETR HITZIG 

New York, New York 
B.A., Harvard, 1954 




JOHN SUDLER HOOD 



Clearwater, Florida 
B.S., M.I.T., 1965 



CHARLES GILBERT 
JACKSON, JR. 

Bronxville, New York 
B.S., Yale, 1965 



ROBERT NEIL HOLTZMAN 

Brooklyn, New York 
B.A., Harvard, 1964 



CONRADE CARL JAFFE 



Boston, Massachusetts 
B.S., M.I.T., 1965 



.YNNE LALOR JOHNSON 

Greenwich. Connecticut 
3.A., Wellesley. 1965 



JON ANTHONY KAY 

Upland. California 
B.A., Stanford, 1965 



MARK ERIC JOSEPHSON 

Teaneck, New Jersey 
B.S.. Trinity. 1965 



ROBERT CHRISTIAN KIESS 

Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Lycoming. 1964 







NEIL BARTON KAVEY 

Scarsdale, New York 
B.A.. Princeton, 1965 





MARK CLAWSON LAMBERT 

San Francisco, California 
B.A., Stanford, 1965 





ROBERT GEORGE LATTES 

Teaneck, New Jersey 
B.A., Columbia, 1963 



ROBERT WHEELER LISLE 

Greenvale, New York 
B.A., Williams, 1965 



WILLIAM ALEXANDER LIEBER 

Blue Bell, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Harvard, 1958 



VIRGINIA ANNE LIVOLSI 

New York, New York 
B.S., Mount St. Vincent, 1965 



JEROME HARVEY LIEBOWITZ 

Fairlawn, New Jersey 
B.A., Trinity, 1965 



JAMES THEODORE LONG 

Avondale Estates, Georgia 

B.A., Yale, 1962 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 

1965 







ROGER ALAN LUNDQUIST 

Red Wing, Minnesota 
B.S., St. Olaf, 1965 



CARLOS EUGENIO 
MENENDEZ 

New York, New York 
B.S., St. Joseph's, 1965 



RICHARD ANGUS MAUN 

Grosse Pointe, Michigan 
B.A., Yale, 1965 



WALTER WOODHULL 
MERRIAM 

Chester, New York 
B.A., Williams, 1965 



JOHN MICHAEL 
MAZZULLO.III 

New Rochelle, New York 
B.A., Rutgers, 1965 



CHRISTOPHER BRUCE 
MICHELSEN 

Boston, Massacusetts 
B.A., Bowdoin, 1961 



ANNE MOORE 

Short Hills, New Jersey 
B.A., Smith, 1965 



MICHAEL EUGENE NEWELL 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
B.A., Columbia, 1965 



PETER ALAN MOSKOVITZ 

Scarsdale, New York 
B.A., Haverford, 1965 



OLUFEMI OLUDOLAPO 
OGUNDIPE 

Lagos, Nigeria 
B.A., Haverford, 1964 



IRWIN NASH 

New York, New York 
B.S., Yale, 1965 



DAVID SIEN CHIN PAO 

Bethesda, Maryland 
B.S., Swarthmore, 1965 




C-i 



CHARLES MARQUIS PETERSON 

Seattle, Washington 
B.A., Carleton, 1965 



f 




^ 




nF^ 



TREVOR ROBERT PRYCE PRICE 

Keene, New Hampshire 
B.A., Yale, 1965 



JOHN W. POLACHECK 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
B.A., Harvard, 1965 



ANDREW C. PRZYBYLA 

New York, New York 

B.S., Columbia, 1960 

Ph.D., Columbia, 1965 



JAMES A. POLLACK 

Binghamton, New York 
B.A., Hamilton, 1965 



ANDREW RAYMOND PULITO 

East Rockaway, New York 
B.A., Holy Cross, 1965 








WILLIAM WALTER REICHERT 

Indianapolis, Indiana 
B.A., Yale, 1965 



DOROTHY ANN ROLLEFSON 

Madison, Wisconsin 
B.A., Stanford, 1965 



JAMES ANDREW REIFFEL 

Scarsdale, New York 
B.A., Duke, 1965 



LAWRENCE ELLIOT 
ROSENBERG 

Mamaroneck, New York 
B.A., Princeton, 1965 



ROBERT JOEL REZA 

Kansas City, Missorui 
B.A., Columbia, 1965 



ARTHUR RUSSELL 
ROSENGLICK 

Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Wesleyan, 1965 



CHARLOTTE RUNDLES 

Durham, North Carolina 
S.. Duke, 1965 



ROBERT DUBOIS SCHWARZ 

New York, New York 
B.A., Harvard, 1965 



SEORGE JOHN SAARI 

Hibbing, Minnesota 
A., St. Olaf, 1965 



THOMAS PETER SCULCO 

Watch Hill, Rhode Island 
B.A., Brown, 1965 



ANTHONY GERARD 
SANTOMAURO 

Franklin Square, New York 
B.S., St. John's, 1965 



STEVEN LEE SHOLEM 

New Rochelle, New York 
B.A., Pennsylvania, 1965 




mt> 




WILLIAM HENRY 
SOUTHWICK 

Plainfield, New Jersey 
B.A., Princeton, 1965 



CHARLES S. STEVENSON, JR. 

Grosse Island, Michigan 

B.A., Princeton, 1959 

Diplomat in English Studies, 

Edinburgh, 1964 



DEMETRIUS STASIUK 

West Caldwell, New Jersey 
B.A., Princeton, 1963 




WALTER H. SINGLE 

New York, New York 
B.A., Columbia, 1965 



ALLEN CARUTHERS STEERE 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 
B.A., Columbia, 1965 



JEFFREY DAYNES THORLEY 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
B.S., Utah, 1965 




I 




ROBERT PETER TITZLER 

New York, New York 

B.S., City College of New York, 1961 



ROGER PHILLIPS VINCENT 

North Olmsted, Ohio 
B.A., Hamilton, 1965 



WILLIAM MORRIS TUCKER 

St. Louis, Missouri 
B.A., Harvard, 1962 
M.A., Yale, 1965 



SAMUEL WEINSTEIN 

Great Neck, New York 
B.A., Yale. 1965 



DENNIS CLINTON TURNER 

Stockton, California 
B.A., Harvard, 1965 



JEFFREY ALAN WEISBERG 

White Plains, New York 
B.S., Columbia, 1965 



ALBERT KRUG WEYMAN 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
B.A., Yale, 1965 



HUGH DOUGLAS WILSON 

Rochester, New York 
B.A., Wesleyan, 1965 



A. ROGER WIEDERHORN 

White Plains, New York 
B.A., Princeton, 1965 



MARTIN WOLFERSTAN 

Cambridge, England 
B.A., Cambridge, 1960 



JOHN CLOSS WILLIAMS 

Glens Falls, New York 
B.S., Cornell, 1965 



FIFIELD WORKUM, JR. 

Bedford, New York 
B.A., Harvard, 1961 





JOHN VOORHEES WYLIE 

New York, New York 
B.A.. Yale, 1964 



HENRY EMERAON 
BUTLER, III 

Los Angeles, California 
B.A., Harvard, 1964 



JOSEPHINE CHANG YEH 

New York, New York 
B.A., Barnard, 1965 





NOT SHOWN 

ROBERT WARREN BUNTING 

Wilmington, Delaware 
B.A.. Carleton, 1965 

LELAND GEORGE DOBBS 

Washington, D.C. 
B.A., Harvard, 1965 



*>$W 




BILLY GERALD YOUNT, JR. 

Tulas, Oklahoma 
B.A., Princeton, 1965 



THOMAS GUALTIERI 

Brooklyn, New York 
B.A., Columbia, 1965 

KENNETH MARVIN TITTLE 

Vancouver, Washington 
B.A.. Stanford. 1965 



131 



faculty 



Dr. George B. Ambose 

Dr. William Amols 

Dr. Raymond A. Amoury 

Dr. David L. Andrews 

Dr. Arthur J. Antenucci 

Dr. Henry Aranow, Jr. 

Dr. Daniel C. Baker, Jr. 

Dr. John M. Baldwin 

Dr. Harold G. Barker 

Dr. Milos Basek 

Dr. A. L Loomis Bell, Jr. 

Dr. Shivaji Bhonslay 

Dr. William A. Blanc 

Dr. Sidney Blumenthal 

Dr. Frederick 0. Bowman 

Drs. S. E. and G. P. Bradley 

Dr. Ellen Regan Brown 

Dr. Harold W. Brown 

Dr. Howard G. Bruenn 

Dr. Stanley M. Bysshe 

Dr. G. A. Carden, Jr. 

Dr. Shu Chien 

Dr. Charles Leigh Christian 

Dr. James W. Correll 

Dr. Stuart Cosgriff 

Dr. Bard Cosman 

Dr. George F. Crikelair 

Dr. E. C. Curnen, Jr. 

Dr. George A. Curran 

Dr. Douglas A. Damrosh 

Dr. Robert C. Darling 

Dr. Felix E. Demartini 

Dr. Roger C. Duvoisin 

Dr. A. G. Devoe 

Dr. R. H. E. Elliott, Jr. 

Dr. Paul D. Ellner 

Dr. Carl R. Feind 

Dr. Marie D. Felix 

Dr. Andrew G. Frantz 

Dr. Henry Clay Frick, II 

Dr. Harry W. Fritts 

Dr. Alexander Garcia 

Dr. Sawnie R. Gaston 

Dr. Arnold P. Gold 

Dr. Dewitt S. Goodman 

Dr. Dean Grandin 

Dr. S. Ashby Grantham 



sponsors 



Dr. Magnus I. Gregersen 

Dr. Albert W. Grokoest 

Dr. Bernard L. Grossman 

Dr. David Habif 

Dr. Frederick P. Herter 

Dr. Edgar M. Housepian 

Dr. Calderon Howe 

Dr. Robert M. Hui 

Dr. George H. Humphreys 

Dr. S. L. James 

Dr. Alfred Jaretski, III 

Dr. Mary Jane Jesse 

Dr. Daniel V. Kimberg 

Dr. Donald W. King 

Dr. Lawrence C. Kolb 

Dr. Donald S. Kornfeld 

Dr. John H. Laragh 

Dr. John K. Lattimer 

Dr. Edgar Leifer 

Dr. John Nicholas Loeb 

Dr. Niels L. Low 

Dr. James R. Malm 

Dr. Alfred M. Markowitz 

Dr. George Melcher 

Dr. George R. Merriam, Jr. 

Dr. H. Houston Merritt 

Dr. Alvin Mesnikoff 

Dr. Robert Michels 

Dr. Charles S. Neer, II 

Dr. S. H. Ngai 

Dr. Emanuel Papper 

Dr. Howard A. Patterson 

Dr. Charles A. Perera 

Dr. George A. Perera 

Dr. Kermit L. Pines 

Dr. Phillip Polatin 

Dr. J. Lawrence Pool 

Dr. Milton R. Porter 

Dr. Charles A. Ragan, Jr. 

Dr. Frederick R. Randall 

Dr. Harry M. Rose 

Dr. Saul L. Sanders 

Dr. Grant Sanger 

Dr. Thomas V. Santulli 

Dr. Malcolm H. Schvey 

Dr. Daniel Sciarra 

Dr. William B. Seaman 

Dr. Edward B. Self 

Dr. Harold F. Spalter 

Dr. Charles F. Stewart 



Dr. Frank E. Stinchfield 
Dr. Richard J. Stock 
Dr. Donald P. Swartz 
Dr. F. C. Symonds 
Dr. John V. Taggart 
Dr. Donald F. Tapley 
Dr. Duane Todd 
Dr. Wolfgang Tretter 
Dr. Ralph J. Veenema 
Dr. Jules Waltner 
Dr. S. C. Wang 
Dr. A. R. Wertheim 
Dr. Robert T. Whitlock 
Dr. Philip D. Wiedel 
Dr. Herbert B. Wilcox, Jr. 
Dr. Susan Williamson 
Dr. Walter A. Wichern 
Dr. James A. Wolff 
Dr. Hans Zinnser 



parents 



Mr. Nat R. Adler 

Dr. and Mrs. Arnold L. Bachman 

Mr. W. A. Bethel 

Dr. and Mrs. C. Bruce Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm D. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Tsuan-Nien Chang 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas DeGregorio 

Mr. George W. Dunn 

Mrs. C. B. Eaton 

Mr. Carl A. Frische 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Q. Garvey, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Goldman 

Dr. and Mrs. Gerald M. Greenspahn 

Dr. William M. Hitzig 

Dr. J. Sudler Hood 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles G. Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton K. Kavey 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Lambert 

Dr. Raffaele Lattes 

Dr. Carlos Menendez 

Mr. Walter A. Merriam 

Dr. and Mrs. Jost J. Michelsen 

Dr. and Mrs. Martin L. Reiffel 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Rollefson 

Mr. Frederick A. 0. Schwartz 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Workum 

Dr. Robert Wylie 



We wish to apologize to any sponsors whose contributions arrived after this page 
went to press. 



132 






o 





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CONGRATULATIONS 



and 



BEST WISHES 



to 



THE CLASS of 1969 



from 



The Manager and Staff 



of Bard Hall 



134 



THE P & S ALUMNI 



ASSOCIATION 



EXTENDS TO EACH MEMBER 
OF THE CLASS OF 1969 
ITS CONGRATULATIONS 



AND SINCEREST BEST WISHES 
FOR A HAPPY AND SUCCESSFUL CAREER 



THE MEDICAL CENTER 
BOOKSTORE 



EXTENDS ITS SINCEREST GOOD WISHES 

TO 

THE CLASS OF 1969 



COOK 
HOSPITAL SUPPLY 

COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 

AND INSTRUMENTATION 

FOR THE PHYSICIAN 

AND HOSPITAL 

554 West 168th Street 

New York, N.Y., 10032 

Tel. 212-795-6000 



COURTESY CARDS 

MEDICAL CENTER PHARMACY 

Jacob Kaplan, F.A.C.A. 
4013 Broadway bet. 168th & 169 Sts. 

WA 3-1258 
Specialists in Prescription Compounding 



ARMORY RESTAURANT 

FINE AMERICAN - ITALIAN FOOD 

Newly Redecorated Dining Room 

4011 Broadway bet. 168th & 169th Sts. 

WA 3-9034 



HEIGHTS 
Camera Center 

The Leading Brands In Photographic 

Equipment And Supplies 

AT SPECIAL PRICES 

The Finest Quality In Photo Finishing 

Done On Premises 

1229 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 

Bet. 171st and 172nd Sts. 

New York, N.Y., 10032 

WA 3-3400 



WA 7-3233 

LARRY ORIN 
JEWELER 

ELECTRONICALLY TESTED WATCH REPAIR 

4009 Broadway at 168th Street 

New York, N.Y., 10032 

Special Discounts for Hospital Personnel 



Expert Tailor & Cleaners 

J. FRENK 

230 Fort Washington Ave. WA 7-3884 
All Kinds of Alterations 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 



7-5700 




Office 254-3131 
Residence 254-3003 

Jane Eaton 

Realtor 

21 J Orinda Way, Orinda Plaza Center 

Lower Level 

Orinda, California 



MANHATTAN UNIFORM CENTER 

4036 Broadway at 170th Street 

"Medical Uniforms To Fit All Needs" 

Telephone LO 8-9130 



TROPICAL 
GARDENS 



BROADWAY near 164th STREET 
NEW YORK, N.Y., 10032 





7 




Compliments of 


Realty Hardware Co., Inc. 




1235 St. Nicholas Ave. 




Near 172 St. 


ON BROADWAY 

Bet. 169 and 170 Sts. 

WA 3-8918 


Tel: LO 8-1230 

OLYMPIC BARBER SHOP 

Nick Tsakiridis 


4021 Broadway New York 10032 




Bet. 169th and 170th Sts. 





"See us for liquor first" 

UPTOWN 
Wines & Liquor Store 

Incorporated 

4033 Broadway at 170 Street 

New York, New York, 10032 

LO 8-2100 



THE GOLD MEDAL 
RESTAURANT 

OUR SPECIALTY: 

Delicious food . . . moderate prices 

Special attention to medical students 

4019 Broadway at 169 St. Tel. 568-2062 



We Deliver 



Como Pizza, Inc. 

Hot & Cold Heros 

4035 Broadway & 170 St. 
NICK and ANGELO 



"When the patient's delirious, 
Think of Bacterias!" 

THE MEDICAL BACTERIOLOGY LAB 

P & S 12-443 

GREETINGS 

from Chris, Mike, Bill, and the gang 



RINGLER-RADOS SURGICAL CORP. 

Surgical & Medical Supplies 

"Only The Best" 

Opposite the Medical Center 

3958 Broadway WA 7-2152-3 




ORTHO PHARMACEUTICAL CORPORATION • RARITAN, NEW JERSEY 




His Nikon microscope 
graduates with him 

Through the years at medical school he benefit* 
from its precision and optical quality. He quickh 
becomes aware that, unlike so-called studem 
microscopes, this is a professional instrumen' 
whose capabilities he will only have begun tc 
discover by the time he is graduated. 
And discover them he will in the years to follow- 
as the Nikon microscope proves its flexibility ir 
coping with the most specialized applications 
Complete interchangeability of eyepieces, stage? 
and other components makes it as versatile a; 
his needs. Nikon flat-field objectives are avail- 
able as original equipment or can be added at 
anytime without modification of this instrumen 

Nikon SBR, featuring a binocular head and 
rectangular, coaxial, graduated mechanical 
stage, is the model most frequently 
chosen by medical students. It is 
also widely used in schools, hos- 
pitals and research laboratories. 
For medical student microscope 
catalog, write: 

Nikon Inc., Instrument Div.J 
Garden City, N.Y. 11530 
Subsidiary of Ehrcnreich Photc 
Optical Industries, Jnc. * 






COMPLIMENTS OF 



<ROCHE 



LABORATORIES 



JAMES N. ROBERTSON 

ROBERT P. LIO 

REPRESENTATIVES 



140 



FOR THE SUPPLY OF 

MINI-SCRUB DRESSES 

MAXI-SCRUB DRESSES 

AND FREQUENTLY NO SCRUB DRESSES, 

THE WOMEN OF THE CLASS OF 1969 

WISH TO THANK MR. BINKERT 
AND THE PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 




WA. 3-2424 "Say it with Flowers" 

MEDICAL CENTER FLOWER 
SHOP 

CARDASIS, INC., FLORIST 

ARTISTIC DECORATION FOR ALL 

OCCASIONS 

The Flower Shop Nearest The Medical Center 

"We Telegraph Flowers" 

4003 Broadway at 168th Street 



SELBY L TURNER 

Life Membership in Leader's Association 

Specialist In 

INSURANCE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEN 

233 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 

10007 

BEekman 3-6620 




RAMER 

SCIENTIFIC CORPORATION 

554 WEST 168th STREET. NEW VORK, N.Y. 10032 / SW 5-6000 



MICROSCOPES, MICROTOMES 

METALLURGICAL AND LABORATORY 

EQUIPMENT 



Authorized Distributors: 

American Optical 

Bausch & Lomb 

E. Leitz 



POLLACK'S BAR-B-QUE 

Bar b-que Chicken & Ribs 

Fried chicken, fish, shrimp, salads, dinners 

4029' 2 Broadway WA 8-9664 



ONE HOUR MARTINIZING 

Free Pick-Up and Delivery 

The Most in Dry Cleaning 

4083 Broadway (172nd Street) 

WA 8-9937 



NELSON'S 

KOSHER DELICATESSEN AND 

RESTAURANT 

CATERERS 

Home Cooked Lunches 

and Full Course Dinners 

Wines — Liquors — Cocktails Served 

4041 Broadway (Corner 170th St.) 

WA 3-9606 



COCHRANE 

PHYSICIAN'S SUPPLIES, 

INC. 



521 East 72nd Street 
New York, N.Y., 10032 



Leonard W. McHugh YUkon 8-8080 
President 



LUIGI'S RESTAURANT & BAR 

Washington Heights' Leading 

Italian Restaurants 

1148 St. Nicholas Ave. 4199 Broadway 

167168th Streets Corner 178th 

WA 3-9216-7 WA 8-9601 




24 HOUR SERVICE ON COLOR 

MORRIS CAMERA SHOP 

3934 Broadway (165th St.) 

Near Medical Center 

Phone LO 8-8590 

Special Discounts to Students 



TOMMY, JOHNNY, AND BOBBY, 

PLEASE COME HOME. 

ALL IS FORGIVEN. 

UNCLE SAM 




BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. 
[U.S.A.] INC. 



Makers of 'Empirin' Compound 
And Other Fine Pharmaceuticals 



142 



Best Wishes 
For a Rewarding and Illustrious Career 



ROGER STUDIOS 



PORTRAITS OF DISTINCTION 



4143 Broadway 

New York, New York 10033 

WA 7-7894 

We Keep Negatives of Your Photographs on File 

for Many Years After Graduation 



Developing tomorrow's pharmaceuticals 
for todays physicians 




Sandoz research center 



£ 



SANDOZ PHARMACEUTICALS. HANOVER. N J SANDOZ 



144 



We speak Doctor. 
Present and Future, 



At Chemical Bank, we can assist in your present 
and future personal and professional financial plans. 
With our complete range of services, we can meet 
your every banking need. 

When you first start your practice, we can help 
you with our Professional Finance Plan and a Check- 
ing Account. 

Later on, as your practice grows, we can help you 
with our Professional Billing Service. Or one of our 
many Personal Trust services. 

So let us help. Stop in at any of our more than 140 
offices and ask for our booklet entitled. "Professional 
Finance Plan." 

The Young Professional. When his needs are fi- 
nancial, his reaction is Chemical, ^ - ■ 

Chemical 
Bank 



CHEMICAL BANK NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY Member F.D.I.C. 



145 



coo% 

VOTING 

ciccy 

GIUE 
GO 

us 



146 



1969 yearbook staff 



EDITORS 

Chris Michelsen 
Carol Garvey 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Mal Brown 

Bruce Brown 

Mike Newell 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 
Roger Vincent 
Don Bachman 
Michael Borecky 
Art Rosenglick 
Joel Budin 
Mitch Goldman 



ART STAFF 
Mike Newell 
Martin Wolferstan 
Mark Lambert 
Jeffrey Weisberg 



EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 
Carlos Menendez 
Geraldine Michelsen 
Jerome Liebowitz 
Louise Brown 
Rhoda Newell 
Don Feinfeld 



SPECIAL PHOTOGRAPHER AND HONORARY STAFF MEMBER 
Elizabeth Wilcox 



IN APPRECIATION 

We wish to thank everyone who participated in the creation of this book, and to 
express our particular appreciation to the following: 
to our sponsors among the faculty and parents, and to our advertisers, for 

their generous support; 
to Mr. Tapia of Roger Studios for his distinguished senior photographs; 
to Andy Murro of the American Yearbook Company for his guidance and 

advice, and especially for his constant accessibility to the yearbook staff; 
to those at the P & S and Bard Hall desks who cheerfully handled the heavy 

flow of mail, messages, and polls; 
and to the patient and helpful spouses of the yearbook staff. 



147 



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